Australia goes it alone

Western Australia covers a third of the continent of Australia, with rocks ranging in age from the most ancient (close to 3.75 billion years old) to those that are forming along the coastline at present. In this book, author Tony Cockbain draws together the various strands of geology covering the period from 100 million years to the present.

This book is published under the banner of WA unearthed, a series that progressively chronicles the geological evolution of Western Australia.

Cover of The birth of supercontinents

What is in the book?

The geological evolution of Western Australia for the past 100 million years is illustrated in this book in easy language and full colour photographs. Topics covered include:

  • Australia’s split from Antarctica
  • four sedimentary depositional cycles between the Paleocene and the Holocene
  • the formation of giant iron ore deposits by regolith processes
  • Western Australia’s recent seismic and earthquake history
  • the precious water resources of a dry and thirsty State

 The book also includes:

  • colourful photos and illustrative figures
  • interesting pull-out boxes with simple explanations
  • many detailed maps of Western Australia

Geologists and enquiring readers will enjoy dipping into this book to learn about the recent geological events that have shaped and are still shaping Western Australia.

How to access the book

Australia goes it alone — the emerging island continent 100 Ma to present by AE Cockbain is available at a cost of $33 (including GST). To buy a hardcopy, please email bookshop@dmirs.wa.gov.au. Order five or more copies and get the books for a special discounted price of $22 each.

Baxter cliffs, Nullarbor Plain, looking east into South Australia, are evidence of the split of Australia from Antarctica
Baxter cliffs, Nullarbor Plain, looking east into South Australia, are evidence of the split of Australia from Antarctica
Intermittent flooding of the Gascoyne River rejuvenates surficial aquifers
Intermittent flooding of the Gascoyne River rejuvenates surficial aquifers

Australia goes it alone — the emerging island continent 100 Ma to present.