Gemstones of Western Australia second edition

Since the discovery of diamonds in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, the mining and processing of these precious gems has developed into one of the State’s major industries. Less well known is that Western Australia contains a plethora of other gemstones, decorative stones and ornamental stone used for sculptural purposes.

An original collaborative project between the Geological Survey of Western Australia (GSWA) and the Gemmological Association of Australia (GAA) produced Mineral Resources Bulletin 25 Gemstones of Western Australia. This publication systematically organises and discusses the history and quality of virtually all known occurrences of gemstones and ornamental stones in Western Australia.

The second edition of Gemstones of Western Australia is an updated version published in response to public demand following depletion of copies of the 2013 edition. These editions form the first systematic works on the subject of gemstones found in the State since the formal inception of GSWA in 1896.

Faceted rare and valuable fancy red diamonds from the Argyle Diamond Mine
Faceted rare and valuable fancy red diamonds from the Argyle Diamond Mine (© Rio Tinto 2014)
Pink rhodonite patterned with black veinlets and dendrites of secondary manganese from Tamworth, New South Wales (courtesy Barry Kayes)
Pink rhodonite patterned with black veinlets and dendrites of secondary manganese from Tamworth, New South Wales (courtesy Barry Kayes)
Blue lepidolite mica interspersed with white albite feldspar and grey quartz, Carlaminda Blue quarry, Yalgoo area (courtesy Glenn Archer)
Blue lepidolite mica interspersed with white albite feldspar and grey quartz, Carlaminda Blue quarry, Yalgoo area (courtesy Glenn Archer)
Zoned growth of an amethyst quartz crystal, which displays a sharply delineated, colourless border with contact planes marked by mineral inclusions; Wyloo area, Ashburton region (WA Museum, specimen 888)
Zoned growth of an amethyst quartz crystal, which displays a sharply delineated, colourless border with contact planes marked by mineral inclusions; Wyloo area, Ashburton region (WA Museum, specimen 888)

What’s in the book?

In this second joint publication by GSWA and the GAA, the authors have once again assembled a comprehensive resource on almost all gemstones and decorative stones used in jewellery and ornamental sculpture known in the State. The second edition has been updated and expanded to include additional occurrences of emerald, opal, agate, chalcedony, organic gems, tiger eye jasper, aragonite, cordierite, black jade, mookaite, fuchsite, jasper, Munjina and Print stones, together with numerous, new gemstone images.

Geographical locations are indicated where possible, and abundant references to earlier work given.

Who should buy the book?

While systematically sound and scientifically authoritative, the second edition of Gemstones of Western Australia is written not only for the professional geologist and gemmologist, but also with the experienced fossicker and amateur rockhound in mind.

How to access the book

Mineral Resources Bulletin 25 Gemstones of Western Australia second edition by J Michael Fetherston, Susan M Stocklmayer, and Vernon C Stocklmayer is available for $55 (including GST). To buy a hardcopy, please email bookshop@dmirs.wa.gov.au  Order five or more copies and get the books for a special discounted price of $40 per copy. Go to eBookshop to download a free PDF.

Contact
For more information contact publications@dmirs.wa.gov.au

Mineral Resources Bulletin 25 Gemstones of Western Australia second edition